Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

5 participantes

Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Mar 5 Oct - 17:55

TEDTalks: Ken Robinson, “Do schools kill creativity?”
https://www.ted.com/talks/sir_ken_robinson_do_schools_kill_creativity

Before you listen
This is how the author is introduced on the TED site:

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence.

What do you think his answer to the question in his talk title will be? What arguments can you predict he is going to use?

Now watch the video without subtitles. You may use them later on to understand parts of the video better, if necessary.

Tasks to do:

Make a list of ways in which, according to the speaker, education as we currently understand it is wrong.
Summarize what the speaker says about intelligence.
Find at least three examples of humour in the video (you may select the ones you find funniest, if you like).
Think about these questions, which you will discuss with others in class:
What could the speaker’s motivation be in using so much humour in this talk?
Does he achieve his purpose?
What are the benefits of using humour in a talk or presentation? What could be the dangers?
Vocabulary: Work out (or look up if you can’t) the meaning of the words and phrases in bold:


01:33 But if you ask about their education, they pin you to the wall.
02:47 And my contention is, all kids have tremendous talents
05:14 What these things have in common is that kids will take a chance. If they don’t know, they’ll have a go.
06:15 So you can imagine what a seamless transition that was.
09:44 And I like university professors, but, you know, we shouldn’t hold them up as the high-water mark of all human achievement.
10:28 If you want real evidence of out-of-body experiences, by the way, get yourself along to a residencial conference of senior academics and pop into the discotheque on the final night.
10:40 And there you will see it. Grown men and women writhing uncontrollably, off the beat.
10:54 Our education system is predicated on the idea of academic ability.
11:10 So, you were probably steered away from things at school when you were a kid, things you liked.
17:35 Our education system has mined our minds in the way that we strip-mine the earth for a particular commodity.

Prepare to talk about these questions in class:

Do you agree with the speaker’s views on education? Why (not)?
Did your own education as a child or teenager foster creativity? If it did, give examples. If it didn’t, how has this affected you in later life?





Última edición por Intruder el Jue 21 Oct - 17:41, editado 2 veces
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por jojomojo Mar 5 Oct - 23:03

Yes
Laughing Laughing Laughing
jojomojo
jojomojo

Mensajes : 17996
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2012

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por atila Miér 6 Oct - 5:00

atila
atila

Mensajes : 26574
Fecha de inscripción : 20/07/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Miér 6 Oct - 12:38

TEDTalks: Ken Robinson, “Do schools kill creativity?”
https://www.ted.com/talks/sir_ken_robinson_do_schools_kill_creativity

Before you listen
This is how the author is introduced on the TED site:

Creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence.

What do you think his answer to the question in his talk title will be?
I think he’s going to say “absolutely yes”
What arguments can you predict he is going to use?
I guess he will say that devolupment of creativity is definitively not a target of our educational system.

Now watch the video without subtitles. You may use them later on to understand parts of the video better, if necessary.

Tasks to do:

Make a list of ways in which, according to the speaker, education as we currently understand it is wrong.

kids have tremendous talents, and we squander them

Creativity now is as important in education as literacy and we should treat it with the same status.

His contention is, kids have extraordinary capacity for innovation.

If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with sth original

We are educating people out of their creative capacities.

Educational systems were created to meet the needs of industrialism

Many highly talented, brilliant, creative people think they're not because the thing they were good at at school wasn't valued or was actually stigmatized.

Suddenly, degrees aren't worth anything. Isn't that true?

Our education system has mined our minds for a particular commodity.


Summarize what the speaker says about intelligence.

We need to radically rethink our view of intelligence.
We know 3 things about intelligence
One, it's diverse. We think about the world in all the ways that we experience it. We think visually, we think in sound, we think khinestetically. We think in abstract terms, we think in movement.
Secondly, intelligence is dynamic, intelligence is interactive.
And the third thing, intelligence is distinct.


Find at least three examples of humour in the video (you may select the ones you find funniest, if you like).

1) If you are at a dinner party, and you say you work in education.....actually, you're not often at dinner parties, frankly, if you work in education..........You're not asked....
2) Teacher to girl: "What are you drawing?" Girl "I'm drawing a picture of God" Teacher "but nobody knows what God looks like" Girl "They will in a minute"
3) I lived in Stratford until about five years ago. In fact we moved from Stratford to LA. So you can imagine what a seamless transition that was.(ironic)
4) “I’ll never find another girl like Sarah” And we were rather pleased about that frankly, because she was the main reason we were leaving the country.


Think about these questions, which you will discuss with others in class:
What could the speaker’s motivation be in using so much humour in this talk?
Does he achieve his purpose?
What are the benefits of using humour in a talk or presentation? What could be the dangers?

Vocabulary: Work out (or look up if you can’t) the meaning of the words and phrases in bold:

01:33 But if you ask about their education, they pin you to the wall.
means "don't let you go".For example if i have something important to tell you I will pin you to the wall until i finish to tell my whole story
02:47 And my contention is, all kids have tremendous talents
an opinion expressed in an argument:
05:14 What these things have in common is that kids will take a chance. If they don’t know, they’ll have a go.
to make an attempt at (doing something)
06:15 So you can imagine what a seamless transition that was.
happening without any sudden changes, interruption, or difficulty:
09:44 And I like university professors, but, you know, we shouldn’t hold them up as the high-water mark of all human achievement.
the most successful point of something:
10:28 If you want real evidence of out-of-body experiences, by the way, get yourself along to a residencial conference of senior academics and pop into the discotheque on the final night.
an experience in which you feel as if you have left your own body and can see it from the outside, usually from above
10:40 And there you will see it. Grown men and women writhing uncontrollably, off the beat.
to make large twisting movements with the body:
10:54 Our education system is predicated on the idea of academic ability.
to say that something is true:
11:10 So, you were probably steered away from things at school when you were a kid, things you liked.
to take someone or something or make someone or something go in the direction in which you want him, her, or it:
17:35 Our education system has mined our minds in the way that we strip-mine the earth for a particular commodity.
a method of obtaining substances such as coal from the ground that involves removing the top layer of soil instead of digging deep holes underground
a substance or product that can be traded, bought, or sold:

Prepare to talk about these questions in class:

Do you agree with the speaker’s views on education? Why (not)?
Did your own education as a child or teenager foster creativity? If it did, give examples. If it didn’t, how has this affected you in later life?

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/predicate
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/steer
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/contention
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/strip-mining


Última edición por Intruder el Miér 6 Oct - 14:22, editado 1 vez
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Mar 12 Oct - 12:22

4. "My Creative Life": a podcast
Listen to a podcast from RTÉ Ireland's National Television and Radio Broadcaster. It is part of a series called "My Creative Life", where children and teenagers talk about ways in which they are creative.

Thirteen-year-old Aoibheann Mangan from Hollymount in Co. Mayo talks about her passion for coding:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1BkPFRlFMg95NNf0qmnmQYi4JObdWWmlD/view


My Creative Life: a podcast

https://open.spotify.com/episode/60JlmOG7McN3YqXH2WxBgf?si=l6KxEVizSLexMOUujDHL0g&dl_branch=1
What does the speaker say about the following? Make notes:

School


A Tesco car park


A website about farm safety


A “wire-frame”


A friend in a wheelchair


Feedback


A free coding hub


Boys and girls


A teacher’s conference

Discuss:
Did you find this story inspiring? Are there any lessons to be learnt from it?
How did you cope with the Irish accent?
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Mar 12 Oct - 22:21

The answers:

My Creative Life: a podcast

https://open.spotify.com/episode/60JlmOG7McN3YqXH2WxBgf?si=l6KxEVizSLexMOUujDHL0g&dl_branch=1

What does the speaker say about the following? Make notes:


1. School – At school teachers usually write down their sums and you copy, but with technology you can do much more, create…

2. A Tesco car park – While her mother was shopping at Tesco she stayed programming at the car park because that place was the nearest wi-fi point available for her.

3. A website about farm safety – The first time she started programming was at school when she and her colleague designed a website about farm safety for a website competition. Although they were totally new, they won some awards like the best group Project or People Of The Year.

4. A “wire-frame” – The first thing she does when she builds a new web is to create a wire-frame, A wire-frame is a layout of what is going to look like.

5. A friend in a wheelchair – One of her latest projects is Hospital Holly and Henry. She’s got a friend called Grace who is in a wheelchair and is afraid of hospitals, and she has created a game in order to stop them feeling scared and wonder what is going to happen (make visits to hospital much more comfortable)

6. Feedback  - It’s very important to get other people’s feedback on how they think the app is or what they think needs to be improved.


7. A free coding hub – A project she’s running in her village where people comes in, have fun and learn how to code

8. Boys and girls – When she started there were mainly boys in the room, but she thinks this is not fair, as girls can do as good as boys. But now she is happy because is 50/50 and this might show girls are trying to get the same opportunities.

9. A teacher’s conference – When she was 10 years old she spoke at a teachers conference for the first time about her experiences with technology.A few people came up to me after he finished and said it had been very inspiring.

Discuss:
Did you find this story inspiring?
Yes, indeed.

Are there any lessons to be learnt from it?

I would like to underline four lessons which I find essential:
1) Creativity is an asset we all have in different degrees. But the thing that really fuels creativity is motivation, to be eager to discover something new.
2) Her trips to Tesco car park in search of the free wi-fi show us perfectly that the absence of means is not an obstacle when you have a sheer determination.
3) There is nothing wrong with “art for art’s sake” but focusing your creativity to help problems in your community gives you a big plus.
4) It is really rewarding to share your knowledge and help others understand technology and profit from it.


How did you cope with the Irish accent?
It stroke me at first listen but could follow her talk perfectly well.
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Mar 12 Oct - 22:40

5. Talent: reading comprehension

Reading: What I Talk About When I Talk About Running. Do activities 2,3 and 5


In every interview I’m asked what’s the most important quality a novelist has to have. It’s pretty obvious: talent. No matter how much enthusiasm and effort you put into writing, if you totally lack literary talent you can forget about being a novelist. This is more of a pre-requisite than a necessary quality. If you don’t have any fuel, even the best car won’t run.

The problem with talent, though, is that in most cases the person involved can’t control its amount or quality. … Talent has a mind of its own and wells up when it wants to, and once it dries up, that’s it. Of course certain poets and rock singers whose genius went out in a blaze of glory – people like Schubert and Mozart, whose dramatic early deaths turned them into legends – have a certain appeal, but for the vast majority of us this isn’t the model we follow.

If I’m asked what the next most important quality is for a novelist, that’s easy too: focus – the ability to concentrate all your limited talents on whatever’s critical at the moment. Without that you can’t accomplish anything of value, while, if you can focus effectively, you’ll be able to compensate for an erratic talent or even a shortage of it. I generally concentrate on work for three or four hours every morning. I sit at my desk and focus totally on what I’m writing. I don’t see anything else, I don’t think about
anything else. …

After focus, the next most important thing for a novelist is, hands down, endurance. If you concentrate on writing three or four hours a day and feel tired after a week of this, you’re not going to be able to write a long work. What’s needed for a writer of fiction – at least one who hopes to write a novel – is the energy to focus every day for half a year, or a year, two years. …

Fortunately, these two disciplines – focus and endurance – are different from talent, since they can be acquired and sharpened through training. You’ll naturally learn both concentration and endurance when you sit down every day at your desk and train yourself to focus on one point. This is a lot like the training of muscles … gradually you’ll expand the limits of what you’re able to do. Almost imperceptibly you’ll make the bar rise. This involves the same process as jogging every day to strengthen your muscles and develop a runner’s physique. …
Patience is a must in this process, but I guarantee the results will come. … The great mystery writer Raymond Chandler once confessed that even if he didn’t write anything, he made sure he sat down at his desk every single day and concentrated. …

Most of what I know about writing I’ve learned through running every day. These are practical, physical lessons. … I know that if I hadn’t become a long-distance runner when I became a novelist, my work would have been vastly different.

Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Miér 13 Oct - 1:07

Questions / Answers reading comprehension
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Miér 13 Oct - 1:13

Written mediation: a summary
Due: Wednesday, 13 October 2021, 11:59 PM

Read chapter 19 of Noah Yuval Harari's 21 Lessons for the 21st Century (pp. 301-312). If you haven't managed to get the book yet, you will find the same text here, published as an article:

https://www.wired.co.uk/article/yuval-noah-harari-extract-21-lessons-for-the-21st-century

An education journal has asked you to write a short text reporting Harari's views on education. Summarize the chapter in no more than 200-250 words. Before you do this task, check these links to help you:

Instructions 1: The speaker refers to academic writing, but the advice is useful for writing summaries of any kind.

Instructions 2:
Reading to Write: Summarizing
Summarizing a text, or distilling its essential concepts into a paragraph or two,
is a useful study tool as well as good writing practice. A summary has two
aims: (1) to reproduce the overarching ideas in a text, identifying the general
concepts that run through the entire piece, and (2) to express these
overarching ideas using precise, specific language. When you summarize, you
cannot rely on the language the author has used to develop his or her points,
and you must find a way to give an overview of these points without your own
sentences becoming too general. You must also make decisions about which
concepts to leave in and which to omit, taking into consideration your purposes
in summarizing and also your view of what is important in this text. Here are
some methods for summarizing:
a. Include the title and identify the author in your first sentence.
b. The first sentence or two of your summary should contain the author’s
thesis, or central concept, stated in your own words. This is the idea that
runs through the entire text--the one you’d mention if someone asked you:
“What is this piece/article about?” Unlike student essays, the main idea in
a primary document or an academic article may not be stated in one
location at the beginning. Instead, it may be gradually developed
throughout the piece or it may become fully apparent only at the end.
c. When summarizing a longer article, try to see how the various stages in
the explanation or argument are built up in groups of related paragraphs.
Divide the article into sections if it isn’t done in the published form. Then,
write a sentence or two to cover the key ideas in each section.
d. Omit ideas that are not really central to the text. Don’t feel that you must
reproduce the author’s exact progression of thought. (On the other hand,
be careful not to misrepresent ideas by omitting important aspects of the
author’s discussion).
e. In general, omit minor details and specific examples. (In some texts, an
extended example may be a key part of the argument, so you would want to
mention it).
f. Avoid writing opinions or personal responses in your summaries (save
these for active reading responses or tutorial discussions).
g. Be careful not to plagiarize the author’s words. If you do use even a few of
the author’s words, they must appear in quotation marks. To avoid
plagiarism, try writing the first draft of your summary without looking back
at the original text.
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Miér 13 Oct - 1:33

https://www.wired.co.uk/article/yuval-noah-harari-extract-21-lessons-for-the-21st-century

Yuval Noah Harari on what the year 2050 has in store for humankind
"As the pace of change increases, the very meaning of being human is likely to mutate and physical and cognitive structures will melt"

Forget programming - the best skill to teach children is reinvention. In this exclusive extract from his new book, the author of Sapiens reveals what 2050 has in store for humankind.

Part one: Change is the only constant
Humankind is facing unprecedented revolutions, all our old stories are crumbling and no new story has so far emerged to replace them. How can we prepare ourselves and our children for a world of such unprecedented transformations and radical uncertainties? A baby born today will be thirty-something in 2050. If all goes well, that baby will still be around in 2100, and might even be an active citizen of the 22nd century. What should we teach that baby that will help him or her survive and flourish in the world of 2050 or of the 22nd century? What kind of skills will he or she need in order to get a job, understand what is happening around them and navigate the maze of life?

Unfortunately, since nobody knows how the world will look in 2050 – not to mention 2100 – we don’t know the answer to these questions. Of course, humans have never been able to predict the future with accuracy. But today it is more difficult than ever before, because once technology enables us to engineer bodies, brains and minds, we can no longer be certain about anything – including things that previously seemed fixed and eternal.

A thousand years ago, in 1018, there were many things people didn’t know about the future, but they were nevertheless convinced that the basic features of human society were not going to change. If you lived in China in 1018, you knew that by 1050 the Song Empire might collapse, the Khitans might invade from the north, and plagues might kill millions. However, it was clear to you that even in 1050 most people would still work as farmers and weavers, rulers would still rely on humans to staff their armies and bureaucracies, men would still dominate women, life expectancy would still be about 40, and the human body would be exactly the same. Hence in 1018, poor Chinese parents taught their children how to plant rice or weave silk, and wealthier parents taught their boys how to read the Confucian classics, write calligraphy or fight on horseback – and taught their girls to be modest and obedient housewives. It was obvious these skills would still be needed in 1050.

In contrast, today we have no idea how China or the rest of the world will look in 2050. We don’t know what people will do for a living, we don’t know how armies or bureaucracies will function, and we don’t know what gender relations will be like. Some people will probably live much longer than today, and the human body itself might undergo an unprecedented revolution thanks to bioengineering and direct brain-computer interfaces. Much of what kids learn today will likely be irrelevant by 2050.

At present, too many schools focus on cramming information. In the past this made sense, because information was scarce, and even the slow trickle of existing information was repeatedly blocked by censorship. If you lived, say, in a small provincial town in Mexico in 1800, it was difficult for you to know much about the wider world. There was no radio, television, daily newspapers or public libraries. Even if you were literate and had access to a private library, there was not much to read other than novels and religious tracts. The Spanish Empire heavily censored all texts printed locally, and allowed only a dribble of vetted publications to be imported from outside. Much the same was true if you lived in some provincial town in Russia, India, Turkey or China. When modern schools came along, teaching every child to read and write and imparting the basic facts of geography, history and biology, they represented an immense improvement.

In contrast, in the 21st century we are flooded by enormous amounts of information, and even the censors don’t try to block it. Instead, they are busy spreading misinformation or distracting us with irrelevancies. If you live in some provincial Mexican town and you have a smartphone, you can spend many lifetimes just reading Wikipedia, watching TED talks, and taking free online courses. No government can hope to conceal all the information it doesn’t like. On the other hand, it is alarmingly easy to inundate the public with conflicting reports and red herrings. People all over the world are but a click away from the latest accounts of the bombardment of Aleppo or of melting ice caps in the Arctic, but there are so many contradictory accounts that it is hard to know what to believe. Besides, countless other things are just a click away, making it difficult to focus, and when politics or science look too complicated it is tempting to switch to funny cat videos, celebrity gossip or porn.

In such a world, the last thing a teacher needs to give her pupils is more information. They already have far too much of it. Instead, people need the ability to make sense of information, to tell the difference between what is important and what is unimportant, and above all to combine many bits of information into a broad picture of the world.

In truth, this has been the ideal of western liberal education for centuries, but up till now even many western schools have been rather slack in fulfilling it. Teachers allowed themselves to focus on shoving data while encouraging pupils “to think for themselves”. Due to their fear of authoritarianism, liberal schools had a particular horror of grand narratives. They assumed that as long as we give students lots of data and a modicum of freedom, the students will create their own picture of the world, and even if this generation fails to synthesise all the data into a coherent and meaningful story of the world, there will be plenty of time to construct a good synthesis in the future. We have now run out of time. The decisions we will take in the next few decades will shape the future of life itself, and we can take these decisions based only on our present world view. If this generation lacks a comprehensive view of the cosmos, the future of life will be decided at random.

Part two: The heat is on
Besides information, most schools also focus too much on providing pupils with a set of predetermined skills such as solving differential equations, writing computer code in C++, identifying chemicals in a test tube or conversing in Chinese. Yet since we have no idea how the world and the job market will look in 2050, we don’t really know what particular skills people will need. We might invest a lot of effort teaching kids how to write in C++ or how to speak Chinese, only to discover that by 2050 AI can code software far better than humans, and a new Google Translate app enables you to conduct a conversation in almost flawless Mandarin, Cantonese or Hakka, even though you only know how to say “Ni hao”.

So what should we be teaching? Many pedagogical experts argue that schools should switch to teaching “the four Cs” – critical thinking, communication, collaboration and creativity. More broadly, schools should downplay technical skills and emphasise general-purpose life skills. Most important of all will be the ability to deal with change, to learn new things and to preserve your mental balance in unfamiliar situations. In order to keep up with the world of 2050, you will need not merely to invent new ideas and products – you will above all need to reinvent yourself again and again.

For as the pace of change increases, not just the economy, but the very meaning of “being human” is likely to mutate. In 1848, the Communist Manifesto declared that “all that is solid melts into air”. Marx and Engels, however, were thinking mainly about social and economic structures. By 2048, physical and cognitive structures will also melt into air, or into a cloud of data bits.

In 1848, millions of people were losing their jobs on village farms, and were going to the big cities to work in factories. But upon reaching the big city, they were unlikely to change their gender or to add a sixth sense. And if they found a job in some textile factory, they could expect to remain in that profession for the rest of their working lives.

By 2048, people might have to cope with migrations to cyberspace, with fluid gender identities, and with new sensory experiences generated by computer implants. If they find both work and meaning in designing up-to-the-minute fashions for a 3D virtual-reality game, within a decade not just this particular profession, but all jobs demanding this level of artistic creation might be taken over by AI. So at 25, you introduce yourself on a dating site as “a twenty-five-year-old heterosexual woman who lives in London and works in a fashion shop.” At 35, you say you are “a gender-non-specific person undergoing age- adjustment, whose neocortical activity takes place mainly in the NewCosmos virtual world, and whose life mission is to go where no fashion designer has gone before”. At 45, both dating and self-definitions are so passé. You just wait for an algorithm to find (or create) the perfect match for you. As for drawing meaning from the art of fashion design, you are so irrevocably outclassed by the algorithms, that looking at your crowning achievements from the previous decade fills you with embarrassment rather than pride. And at 45, you still have many decades of radical change ahead of you.

Please don’t take this scenario literally. Nobody can really predict the specific changes we will witness. Any particular scenario is likely to be far from the truth. If somebody describes to you the world of the mid-21st century and it sounds like science fiction, it is probably false. But then if somebody describes to you the world of the mid 21st-century and it doesn’t sound like science fiction – it is certainly false. We cannot be sure of the specifics, but change itself is the only certainty.

Such profound change may well transform the basic structure of life, making discontinuity its most salient feature. From time immemorial, life was divided into two complementary parts: a period of learning followed by a period of working. In the first part of life you accumulated information, developed skills, constructed a world view, and built a stable identity. Even if at 15 you spent most of your day working in the family’s rice field (rather than in a formal school), the most important thing you were doing was learning: how to cultivate rice, how to conduct negotiations with the greedy rice merchants from the big city and how to resolve conflicts over land and water with the other villagers. In the second part of life you relied on your accumulated skills to navigate the world, earn a living, and contribute to society. Of course, even at 50 you continued to learn new things about rice, about merchants and about conflicts, but these were just small tweaks to well-honed abilities.

By the middle of the 21st century, accelerating change plus longer lifespans will make this traditional model obsolete. Life will come apart at the seams, and there will be less and less continuity between different periods of life. “Who am I?” will be a more urgent and complicated question than ever before.

This is likely to involve immense levels of stress. For change is almost always stressful, and after a certain age most people just don’t like to change. When you are 15, your entire life is change. Your body is growing, your mind is developing, your relationships are deepening. Everything is in flux, and everything is new. You are busy inventing yourself. Most teenagers find it frightening, but at the same time, also exciting. New vistas are opening before you, and you have an entire world to conquer. By the time you are 50, you don’t want change, and most people have given up on conquering the world. Been there, done that, got the T-shirt. You much prefer stability. You have invested so much in your skills, your career, your identity and your world view that you don’t want to start all over again. The harder you’ve worked on building something, the more difficult it is to let go of it and make room for something new. You might still cherish new experiences and minor adjustments, but most people in their fifties aren’t ready to overhaul the deep structures of their identity and personality.

There are neurological reasons for this. Though the adult brain is more flexible and volatile than was once thought, it is still less malleable than the teenage brain. Reconnecting neurons and rewiring synapses is damned hard work. But in the 21st century, you can hardly afford stability. If you try to hold on to some stable identity, job or world view, you risk being left behind as the world flies by you with a whooooosh. Given that life expectancy is likely to increase, you might subsequently have to spend many decades as a clueless fossil. To stay relevant – not just economically, but above all socially – you will need the ability to constantly learn and to reinvent yourself, certainly at a young age like 50.

As strangeness becomes the new normal, your past experiences, as well as the past experiences of the whole of humanity, will become less reliable guides. Humans as individuals and humankind as a whole will increasingly have to deal with things nobody ever encountered before, such as super-intelligent machines, engineered bodies, algorithms that can manipulate your emotions with uncanny precision, rapid man-made climate cataclysms, and the need to change your profession every decade. What is the right thing to do when confronting a completely unprecedented situation? How should you act when you are flooded by enormous amounts of information and there is absolutely no way you can absorb and analyse it all? How to live in a world where profound uncertainty is not a bug, but a feature?

To survive and flourish in such a world, you will need a lot of mental flexibility and great reserves of emotional balance. You will have to repeatedly let go of some of what you know best, and feel at home with the unknown. Unfortunately, teaching kids to embrace the unknown and to keep their mental balance is far more difficult than teaching them an equation in physics or the causes of the first world war. You cannot learn resilience by reading a book or listening to a lecture. The teachers themselves usually lack the mental flexibility that the 21st century demands, for they themselves are the product of the old educational system.

The Industrial Revolution has bequeathed us the production-line theory of education. In the middle of town there is a large concrete building divided into many identical rooms, each room equipped with rows of desks and chairs. At the sound of a bell, you go to one of these rooms together with 30 other kids who were all born the same year as you. Every hour some grown-up walks in and starts talking. They are all paid to do so by the government. One of them tells you about the shape of the Earth, another tells you about the human past, and a third tells you about the human body. It is easy to laugh at this model, and almost everybody agrees that no matter its past achievements, it is now bankrupt. But so far we haven’t created a viable alter- native. Certainly not a scaleable alternative that can be implemented in rural Mexico rather than just in upmarket California suburbs.

Part three: Hacking humans
So the best advice I could give a 15-year-old stuck in an outdated school somewhere in Mexico, India or Alabama is: don’t rely on the adults too much. Most of them mean well, but they just don’t understand the world. In the past, it was a relatively safe bet to follow the adults, because they knew the world quite well, and the world changed slowly. But the 21st century is going to be different. Due to the growing pace of change, you can never be certain whether what the adults are telling you is timeless wisdom or outdated bias.

So on what can you rely instead? Technology? That’s an even riskier gamble. Technology can help you a lot, but if technology gains too much power over your life, you might become a hostage to its agenda. Thousands of years ago, humans invented agriculture, but this technology enriched just a tiny elite, while enslaving the majority of humans. Most people found themselves working from sunrise till sunset plucking weeds, carrying water buckets and harvesting corn under a blazing sun. It can happen to you too.

Technology isn’t bad. If you know what you want in life, technology can help you get it. But if you don’t know what you want in life, it will be all too easy for technology to shape your aims for you and take control of your life. Especially as technology gets better at understanding humans, you might increasingly find yourself serving it, instead of it serving you. Have you seen those zombies who roam the streets with their faces glued to their smartphones? Do you think they control the technology, or does the technology control them?

Should you rely on yourself, then? That sounds great on Sesame Street or in an old-fashioned Disney film, but in real life it doesn’t work so well. Even Disney is coming to realise it. Just like Inside Out’s Riley Andersen, most people hardly know themselves, and when they try to “listen to themselves” they easily become prey to external manipulations. The voice we hear inside our heads was never trustworthy, because it always reflected state propaganda, ideological brainwashing and commercial advertisement, not to mention biochemical bugs.

As biotechnology and machine learning improve, it will become easier to manipulate people’s deepest emotions and desires, and it will become more dangerous than ever to just follow your heart. When Coca-Cola, Amazon, Baidu or the government knows how to pull the strings of your heart and press the buttons of your brain, could you still tell the difference between your self and their marketing experts?

To succeed in such a daunting task, you will need to work very hard on getting to know your operating system better. To know what you are, and what you want from life. This is, of course, the oldest advice in the book: know thyself. For thousands of years, philosophers and prophets have urged people to know themselves. But this advice was never more urgent than in the 21st century, because unlike in the days of Laozi or Socrates, now you have serious competition. Coca-Cola, Amazon, Baidu and the government are all racing to hack you. Not your smartphone, not your computer, and not your bank account – they are in a race to hack you, and your organic operating system. You might have heard that we are living in the era of hacking computers, but that’s hardly half the truth. In fact, we are living in the era of hacking humans.

The algorithms are watching you right now. They are watching where you go, what you buy, who you meet. Soon they will monitor all your steps, all your breaths, all your heartbeats. They are relying on Big Data and machine learning to get to know you better and better. And once these algorithms know you better than you know yourself, they could control and manipulate you, and you won’t be able to do much about it. You will live in the matrix, or in The Truman Show. In the end, it’s a simple empirical matter: if the algorithms indeed understand what’s happening within you better than you understand it, authority will shift to them.

Of course, you might be perfectly happy ceding all authority to the algorithms and trusting them to decide things for you and for the rest of the world. If so, just relax and enjoy the ride. You don’t need to do anything about it. The algorithms will take care of everything. If, however, you want to retain some control of your personal existence and of the future of life, you have to run faster than the algorithms, faster than Amazon and the government, and get to know yourself before they do. To run fast, don’t take much luggage with you. Leave all your illusions behind. They are very heavy.

Yuval Noah Harari's 21 Lessons for the 21st Century (Vintage Digital) is published on August 30
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Miér 13 Oct - 2:03




Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Lenovo11
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Miér 13 Oct - 17:13

My first summary:

In the first chapter of his new book 21 Lessons for the 21st Century Yuval Noah Harari tackles with education at present times and how to make it worthwhile in future.

According to him, as the world is evolving in a constant and faster change driven by technology, nobody can predict with accuracy what kind of skills will be needed in future. At the same time he points out that too many exposure to information may distract us from what really matters, and therefore we need to learn to be selective to identify what is important rather than collecting tons of data. So, after analysing in depth the foundations of our traditional education, he believes that this system has to switch, from the simple teaching of learning technical skills and the gathering of information, to the learning of the ability of dealing with change, the ability of constant self-reinvention.

Even if his proposed guidelines were to be followed in future, the author thinks that their impact on our wealth social will not be achieved without a prior new widespread attitude towards change. In a few words, fear of change must ideally give way to lust for change, although he realizes this is going to be harder for seniors. As a tool to face succesfully these uncertain times he strongly recommends us a deep self-knowledege - who we really are, what we really want - rather than depending too much on technology.


Última edición por Intruder el Miér 20 Oct - 13:39, editado 1 vez
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Dom 17 Oct - 14:22

Activities to do by October 20

This week you should do the following activities from the activity book in Topic 1, Creativity:

Chapter 6: Follow the instructions. One of the tasks consists in posting a message on a forum. Forum posts are not graded, but you may get feedback about mistakes (individual or for the group), and participation is considered a plus for assessment.
Chapter 7: We'll check the answers in class.
Chapter 8: You'll get an assessment mark for this.
Also in Topic 1, you have the forum "Five measures to make your company more creative". Don't post a proposal there unless you were in class on October 13 and did the group activity. However, feel free to comment on other students' proposals if you want.

21 Lessons for the 21st Century: Start reading Part I, "The Technological Challenge". You don't need to finish reading it this week and there's no specific task to do for now. In the next class I'll set some activities for later on.

4. Carry on with the activities in MyELT (Keynote Proficient).

Have a good week.
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por jojomojo Dom 17 Oct - 14:35

@Intruder escribió:My first summary:

In the first chapter of his new book 21 Lessons for the 21st Century Yuval Noah Harari tackles with education at present times and how to make it worthwhile in future.

According to him, as the world is evolving in a constant and faster change driven by technology, nobody can predict with accuracy what kind of skills will be needed in future. At the same time he points out that too much exposure to information may distract us from what really matters, and therefore we need to learn to be selective to identify what is important rather than collecting tons of data. So, after analysing in depth the foundations of our traditional education, he believes that this system has to switch, from the simple teaching of learning technical skills and the gathering of information, to the learning of the ability of dealing with change, the ability of constant self-reinvention.

Even if his proposed guidelines were to be followed in future, the author thinks that their impact on our social wealth will not be achieved without a prior new widespread attitude towards change. In a few words, fear of change must ideally give way to desire for change, although he realizes this is going to be harder for seniors. As a tool to successfully face these uncertain times he strongly recommends us a deep self-knowledege - who we really are, what we really want - rather than depending too much on technology.

I took the liberty of correcting you.

Very Happy
jojomojo
jojomojo

Mensajes : 17996
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2012

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Dom 17 Oct - 15:05

@jojomojo escribió:
@Intruder escribió:My first summary:

In the first chapter of his new book 21 Lessons for the 21st Century Yuval Noah Harari tackles with education at present times and how to make it worthwhile in future.

According to him, as the world is evolving in a constant and faster change driven by technology, nobody can predict with accuracy what kind of skills will be needed in future. At the same time he points out that too much exposure to information may distract us from what really matters, and therefore we need to learn to be selective to identify what is important rather than collecting tons of data. So, after analysing in depth the foundations of our traditional education, he believes that this system has to switch, from the simple teaching of learning technical skills and the gathering of information, to the learning of the ability of dealing with change, the ability of constant self-reinvention.

Even if his proposed guidelines were to be followed in future, the author thinks that their impact on our social wealth will not be achieved without a prior new widespread attitude towards change. In a few words, fear of change must ideally give way to desire for change, although he realizes this is going to be harder for seniors. As a tool to successfully face these uncertain times he strongly recommends us a deep self-knowledege - who we really are, what we really want - rather than depending too much on technology.

I took the liberty of correcting you.

Very Happy

Thanks a lot! You're always welcomed!
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Dom 17 Oct - 16:34

Also in Topic 1, you have the forum "Five measures to make your company more creative". Don't post a proposal there unless you were in class on October 13 and did the group activity. However, feel free to comment on other students' proposals if you want.

1) Provide employees with inspiring workplaces and tools: Natural light, green environment, ergonomic  furnishings, standing /sitting desks, wifi all over the office...

2) Expand your team’s  knowledge base: Encourage your staff to register for specialized courses, to apply for a university or a master degree.

3) Start an international employee exchange programme  if your  organization has subsidiaries in different countries.

4) Destroy your "stereotyped" fixed ideas. Cooperativa de Guissona might be a good example as they stopped being a supplier for retailers (as other manufacturers were) and started to develop succesfully their own chain of groceries.

5) Let your ideas "incubate" by taking a break from them. Some ideas look bright at first but are not ready or feasible to be launched into the real world. In other situations, it is the real world the one which is still not ready for your revolutionary idea.


Hope Jojo will show up.. Laughing


Última edición por Intruder el Dom 17 Oct - 22:29, editado 1 vez
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Shanks Dom 17 Oct - 21:13

Exemple = example

Shanks

Mensajes : 487
Fecha de inscripción : 20/08/2017

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Dom 17 Oct - 22:30

@Shanks escribió:Exemple = example

Thank you Shanks!

Never let me walk alone...
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Dom 17 Oct - 22:53

"Creative Person of the Year" forum

After watching the videos in chapter 6, imagine that the two women who appear in them are the finalists in a visual arts competition called "Creative Person of the Year". Its purpose is to bring to the fore the achievements of original  creators whose work is considered to be of high quality and social relevance.

Post a message on the forum supporting one of the candidates and giving reasons for your choice. Alternatively, you may respond to someone else's post.



6. Two examples of creativity: compare and contrast

Watch these two videos and do the following tasks:





1. Make a list of at least three new words or phrases you have learnt from each video.

2. Think of what the two types of creativity exemplified by the women in these videos and answer these questions:

-What do they have in common?

-What are the differences between them?

- What is your reaction to their work?

Prepare to share your answers with other students in class.

3. Take part in this forum:

"Creative person of the year" forum
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Dom 17 Oct - 22:54

Draft for the answers:

1. Make a list of at least three new words or phrases you have learnt from each video.

FILMMAKER MEAGAN CIGNOLI
upsize her career

2. Think of what the two types of creativity exemplified by the women in these videos and answer these questions:

-What do they have in common?

-What are the differences between them?

- What is your reaction to their work?

Prepare to share your answers with other students in class.

3. Take part in this forum:

"Creative person of the year" forum


Última edición por Intruder el Mar 19 Oct - 14:15, editado 1 vez
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Lun 18 Oct - 1:37

7. "The Neuroscience of Genius, Creativity and Improvisation"

Watch this video and do the activity. We'll check the answers in class.



The Neuroscience of Genius, Creativity, and Improvisation, with Heather Berlin


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4anaU6rdU1Q

Say if these statements are true or false according to Heather Berlin, and correct the false ones.

Her approach is to study genius as a unified phenomenon.
FALSE: What they do is to break this concept down to its constituent parts and try to understand the neural mechanisms that drive those things.
It is impossible to quantify creativity.
FALSE: She said "it's been actually quite a problem how to quantify creativity" SO FAR
When people are being creative, their conscious brain is highly active.
???? : When we have our conscious brain highly active it's kind of supressing a lot of what's going on outside on oneself.
Self-awareness is activated when someone is being creative.
FALSE: People are being creative when the part of their brain that has to do with the sense of self-awareness is turned down.
In improvising jazz musicians and rappers the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is especially active.
FALSE: These artist have a decreased activation in that dorsolateral prefrontal cortex that has to do with self-awareness.
The medial prefrontal cortex responds to outside stimuli.
FALSE: It's coming from within'. It's stimulus independant.
There are similarities in brain functioning when dreaming and when being creative.
TRUE
A scanner’s loud clicking sound was used by the speaker in an experiment.
FALSE: They picked a beat that matches the clicking beat in the scanner, so that it's not so distracting.
In this experiment, the participants were asked to ignore external input.
FALSE: During the experiment, they show the participants random images and give'em real-time audience feedback, in order to reproduce a real world situation.
When someone is being creative, the executive neuron network is turned off.


Última edición por Intruder el Miér 20 Oct - 14:46, editado 10 veces
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por thespidersfrommars Lun 18 Oct - 9:46

Intruder, me gusta mucho este tópic!!!. Eres profesor de inglés o algo?.

Soy muy curioso con los idiomas, siempre estoy trasteando con diccionarios, para aprender palabas nuevas.
thespidersfrommars
thespidersfrommars

Mensajes : 2546
Fecha de inscripción : 20/10/2008

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Shanks Lun 18 Oct - 14:04

@Intruder escribió:
@Shanks escribió:Exemple = example

Thank you Shanks!

Never let me walk alone...

Thank you = Ta (Scouse, pronunciado taaa)

Shanks

Mensajes : 487
Fecha de inscripción : 20/08/2017

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por jojomojo Lun 18 Oct - 14:09

@Shanks escribió:
@Intruder escribió:
@Shanks escribió:Exemple = example

Thank you Shanks!

Never let me walk alone...

Thank you = Ta (Scouse, pronunciado taaa)

Taaa laaa
jojomojo
jojomojo

Mensajes : 17996
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2012

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Shanks Lun 18 Oct - 14:41

@jojomojo escribió:
@Shanks escribió:
@Intruder escribió:
@Shanks escribió:Exemple = example

Thank you Shanks!

Never let me walk alone...

Thank you = Ta (Scouse, pronunciado taaa)

Taaa laaa

'S'right, luv.


Shanks

Mensajes : 487
Fecha de inscripción : 20/08/2017

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Mar 19 Oct - 13:57

@thespidersfrommars escribió:Intruder, me gusta mucho este tópic!!!. Eres profesor de inglés o algo?.

Soy muy curioso con los idiomas, siempre estoy trasteando con diccionarios, para aprender palabas nuevas.

Muchas gracias, me apunté este año al nivel C2.1 de la Escuela Oficial de Idiomas, y ha habido dos factores que me llevaron a abrir el hilo....

1) El elevado contenido audiovisual del curso, y la mala organización de la web que usa la escuela (moodle), que me dificulta encontrar los contenidos con rapidez.
2) Mi ordenador está empezando a fallar, y a veces me ha dejado colgado, y aquí en el foro voy creando una especie de "back-up" ordenado..........menudo invento......utilizar el foro azkena como aula de estudio...blas estará satisfecho....

Y hay un tercer beneficio, no buscado inicialmente.... pero caído del cielo.......because here are angels like Jojo and Shanks helping me with my homework... axl
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Miér 20 Oct - 2:42

@Intruder escribió:"Creative Person of the Year" forum

After watching the videos in chapter 6, imagine that the two women who appear in them are the finalists in a visual arts competition called "Creative Person of the Year". Its purpose is to bring to the fore the achievements of original  creators whose work is considered to be of high quality and social relevance.

Post a message on the forum supporting one of the candidates and giving reasons for your choice. Alternatively, you may respond to someone else's post.







My post will be:

I’ve seen a selection of Sheba Chhachhi’s best works and found them absolutely
captivating,
eye-catching,
meaningful,
touching,
soul-moving.....

I'm pretty convinced that Chhachhi deserves all our praise and admiration for her mastery. Nevertheless, I have seen many photographic exhibitions or installations  covering  the same topics – ethnicities, environment, feminist demonstrations, women at work -  in the past. In other words,  there’s nothing new to me.

On the other hand, It is a fact that Meagan Cignoli has created and succesfully developed a brand new category in visual arts: the short-form vídeo, thus reflecting  a higher level of creativity than Chhachhi’s.

No matter what was the goal every artist looked for, given this is a creativity contest, I have no hesitation in voting for Cignoli and encourage you all to do the same.
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Shanks Miér 20 Oct - 10:23

On the other hand, It …. = no capital letter after a comma

Shanks

Mensajes : 487
Fecha de inscripción : 20/08/2017

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por jojomojo Miér 20 Oct - 10:43

You've got a pretty impressive vocabulary. Very Happy

Good luck with your assignments.
jojomojo
jojomojo

Mensajes : 17996
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2012

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Miér 20 Oct - 12:07

@Shanks escribió:On the other hand, It …. = no capital letter after a comma

Damn keyboard! Thanks for the warning! and congrats for yesterday's match..
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL) Empty Re: Materiales aprendizaje inglés (Learning TOOL)

Mensaje por Intruder Miér 20 Oct - 12:10

@jojomojo escribió:You've got a pretty impressive vocabulary. Very Happy

Good luck with your assignments.

Thank you! Congrats for yesterday's match!
Intruder
Intruder

Mensajes : 10628
Fecha de inscripción : 24/08/2016

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Volver arriba


 
Permisos de este foro:
No puedes responder a temas en este foro.